Content

Contributors in:

Marion Gymnich, Hanne Birk, Denise Burkhard (Ed.)

"Harry - yer a wizard", page 251 - 254

Exploring J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter Universe

1. Edition 2017, ISBN print: 978-3-8288-4035-5, ISBN online: 978-3-8288-6751-2, https://doi.org/10.5771/9783828867512-251

Series: Wissenschaftliche Beiträge aus dem Tectum Verlag: Anglistik, vol. 6

Tectum, Baden-Baden
Bibliographic information
Contributors Franziska Becker studied English and History in Bonn and Aberdeen, UK, and completed her B.A. thesis on Merlin in 2011. In 2014, she completed her M.A. in English Literatures and Cultures with a thesis on the ‘immortality’ of vampires at the University of Bonn, where she is currently working on a PhD project. Her research interests include fantasy, medieval studies, fairy tales and folklore, as well as British literature from the 18th and 19th centuries. Moreover, she is a board member of the Bonn Group for Eighteenth-Century Studies (BGECS). Hanne Birk studied English and German Literatures and Cultures as well as Philosophy in Freiburg and at Brock University, Ontario, Canada. 2003-2005 research assistant in the Collaborative Research Centre ‘Memory Cultures’ (University of Giessen). 2008 PhD thesis (AlterNative Memories: Kulturspezifische Inszenierungen von Erinnerung in zeitgenössischen Romanen indigener Autor/inn/en Australiens, Kanadas und Aotearoas/Neuseelands). 2007- 2009 research and work stay in London, UK and Heraklion, Crete. Since 2012 postdoc at the Department of English, American, and Celtic Studies, University of Bonn. Research and publications focus on Indigenous literatures and cultures, postcolonial theories, Pacific literatures, narratologies, children’s literature and memory studies. Vera Bub studied English Studies and Musicology/Sound Studies at the University of Bonn, Germany and completed her B.A. thesis on “Elements of Christianity in Anglophone Fantasy Literature and Popular Culture” in 2017. She is currently enrolled in the M.A. programme “English Literatures and Cultures”. Her research interests include children’s and young adult literature, popular culture and 19th-century literature. Denise Burkhard studied English Studies, History and Educational Sciences at the University of Bonn, and completed her B.A. thesis on Tolkien in 2014. She completed her M.A. in “English Literatures and Cultures” with a thesis on trauma in neo-Victorian Literature at the University of Bonn in 2016. Currently, she is working on a PhD project at the University of Bonn. Her research interests include children’s and young adult literature, neo-Victorian literature, fandom studies as well as 19th-century British literature and culture. Michèle Ciba studied English and Media Studies at Bonn University and completed her B.A. thesis on the Hunger Games trilogy in 2017. She is currently enrolled in the Master’s program in “English Literatures and Cultures” at Bonn University. She holds a scholarship awarded by the Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes. Her research interests include speculative fiction, postcolonial theory and adaptation studies as well as film theory. Franziska Göbel studies English Studies and German Studies (Comparative Literature and Cultural Anthropology) at the University of Bonn. Her research interests include old and medieval English literature, fantasy fiction (with a special focus on the works of J.K. Rowling and J.R.R. Tolkien), popular culture studies and gender studies. Another field of interest are Indigenous literatures and cultures with a strong emphasis on Aotearoa New Zealand and Māori literature. CONTRIBUTORS 252 Marion Gymnich is Professor of English Literature and Culture at the University of Bonn. She studied English, German and Slavic Studies at the University of Cologne; she holds a PhD in English Literary Studies from the University of Cologne and did postdoctoral research at the University of Giessen, where she was coordinator of the International PhD Program “Literary and Cultural Studies”. She was visiting lecturer at the University of Łodz and visiting professor at the University of Graz. She has published widely on British literature from the 19th century to the present, children’s literature, postcolonial literature, genre theory, narrative theory, gender studies, audio-visual media and memory studies. Laura Hartmann studied English and Romance Studies in Bonn and Sheffield, UK, and completed her B.A. thesis on Chaucer in 2012. In 2015, she completed her M.A. in English Literatures and Cultures with a thesis on British detective novels at the University of Bonn, where she is currently working on a PhD project. Her research interests include crime fiction, medieval studies, fairy tales and folklore as well as British literature from the 18th and 19th centuries. She is a board member of the Bonn Group for Eighteenth-Century Studies (BGECS). Marthe-Siobhán Hecke studies three degrees at the University of Bonn. She started with Philosophy, German Studies and Educational Sciences, completed her B.A. thesis on Hannah Arendt in 2014 and is now about to complete both the Master of Arts (in Philosophy) and the Master of Education (German Studies, Educational Sciences and Philosophy). Currently, she is also working on her (second) B.A. thesis in English and Celtic Studies on Ossian. After finishing all her degrees, she plans to pursue an academic career. Sarah Hofmann studies English Studies and Comparative Literatures and Cultures at the University of Bonn. Her research interests include 18th-century literatures and cultures, early modernism as well as literatures and cultures from 1900 to the present. She has been a member of the Bonn Group for Eighteenth-Century Studies (BGECS) since 2015 and a board member since 2017. Carsten Kullmann studies English at the University of Leipzig. He completed his B.A. thesis on the representation of the First World War in British collective memory in 2015. He subsequently enrolled in Leipzig’s Master programme and submitted his Master’s thesis on the issue of racism and fascism in the Harry Potter universe in July 2017. His research interests include Young Adult Fiction, political literature and memory studies. Jule Lenzen is currently doing a Master’s degree in English literature (“Literature and Modernity: 1900 to the Present”) at the University of Edinburgh. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Bonn in English and Celtic Studies. In her B.A. thesis she explored contemporary feminist writings from Uganda. Her research interests include feminist studies, postcolonial literatures and Celtic Studies. She is very active in supporting the feminist movement in her continuing volunteer work for UN Women. Anne Mahler is a PhD student at University College Cork (Ireland). Her PhD project focuses on literary responses to the Columbine High School shooting and their construction of individual and collective trauma. She holds two B.A. degrees, in British Studies and Sciences of Communication and Media, from Leipzig University and graduated from the University of Bristol (UK) with a Master’s degree in Victorian Literature. Her research interests centre on trauma studies, Victorian literature and the Gothic as well as medical humanities. CONTRIBUTORS 253 Svenja Renzel studied Creative Writing and Film Studies at Kingston University, London. After completing her Bachelor’s degree in 2013, she participated in the M.A. programme in “English Literatures and Cultures” at the University of Bonn. She completed her M.A. thesis in 2017 and is currently working on her PhD project. Her main research interests include gender studies, popular culture and film studies (in particular adaptation studies) as well as fantasy, horror literature and 19th-century British literature and culture. Klaus Scheunemann studied History, English and American Literature as well as Psychology at the University of Giessen. He completed a PhD in English Literature (Der Blick von außen: Die Darstellung von ‘Englishness’ und ihre Funktionalisierung in deutschen Geschichten englischer Literatur, 2008) in the context of the Collaborative Research Centre ‘Memory Cultures’ (Giessen) under the supervision of Professor Herbert Grabes. He was employed as research assistant in Giessen and Bonn before holding an administrative position in the office of the Dean of the School of Humanities (University of Bonn) from 2010-2016. Since 2016 he is a senior lecturer at the Department of English, American and Celtic Studies (Bonn). His research and publications focus on film and television studies, literary history, memory studies, science fiction and 19th-century British literature. Anne Schneider studied German, English and French law in Münster (Westf.) and is currently a student in the M.A. program “English Literatures and Cultures” in Bonn, Germany. 2007-2008 Master of Law course in Bristol, UK (LL.M. in Commercial Law). 2008-2009 research assistant at the Criminal Law Department of the University of Münster. 2009-2012 Legal Training (Rechtsreferendariat) at the District Court Münster and Second State Exam. 2010 PhD (Thesis: Die Verhaltensnorm im Internationalen Strafrecht). Since 2012 postdoc at the Criminal Law Department, University of Bonn. 2015 research stay in Turin, Italy. Research and publications focus on Conflicts of Jurisdiction, European and Comparative Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure, Corporate Criminal Liability, German Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure, Legal Methods and Legal Theory and Law and Literature. Julia Stibane studies English, History and Education at the University of Bonn. She is currently completing her B.A. thesis on Harry Potter in the tradition of 19th-century literature. Her research interests include children’s literature, postcolonial literature and 19th-century literature. Aleksandra Szczodrowski studied English Studies, Politics and Sociology at Heinrich- Heine-University, Düsseldorf, the University of Bonn and Maynooth University, Ireland. She completed her B.A. thesis on sexual violence against Indigenous women in the US in Louise Erdrich’s The Round House and Jason Momoa’s Road to Paloma in 2017. Currently she studies “English Literatures and Cultures” (M.A.) at the University of Bonn. Her research interests include postcolonial studies with a special focus on Indigenous cultures and literatures, gender studies and trauma studies. Naemi Winter studied History and French at the University of Bonn and completed her B.A. thesis on Henry FitzEmpress’s role in the 12th-century English Civil War, commonly referred to as ‘the Anarchy’, in 2016. She is currently finishing the first year of her M.A. in Medieval History at the University of Bonn and is employed as a research assistant at the Department of Auxiliary Historical Sciences, which are a particular focus of her studies. Her main interests in this area are diplomatics, chronology and palaeography.

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Abstract

J. K. Rowling’s “ Harry Potter” series (1997–2007) has turned into a global phenomenon and her Potterverse is still expanding. The contributions in this volume provide a range of inter- and transdisciplinary approaches to various dimensions of this multifacetted universe. The introductory article focuses on different forms of world building in the novels, the translations, the film series and the fandom.

Part I examines various potential sources for Rowling’s series in folklore, the Arthurian legend and Gothic literature. Further articles focus on parallels between the “Harry Potter” series and Celtic Druidism, the impact Victorian notions of gender roles have had on the representation of the Gaunt family, the reception of (medieval and Early Modern) history in the series and the influence of Christian concepts on the world view expressed in the novels.

Part II focuses on a range of prominent political and social themes in the series, including conspiracy, persecution and terror, racism as well as the role of economic, social and cultural capital. Other articles explore the concept of a Magical Criminal Law and its consequences as well as the significance of secrets and forbidden places.

The articles in Part III go beyond the novels by taking the stage play “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”, the movie “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”, Pottermore and fan fiction into account. Main topics in this part include trauma theory/PTSD, queerbaiting, a ‘post’-colonial analysis of the representation of Native Americans in Rowling’s “History of Magic in North America” and the depiction of violence, incest and rape in fan fictions.

The concluding article highlights the diversification of the Potterverse and analyses strategies informing its ongoing expansion.